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Dan Goodman's prediction and politics journal.

Wednesday, January 21, 2004

Wednesday January 21, 2004. To Pillsbury House, where I did data entry for the Community Barter Network.

***"Where's my flying car?" has become a catchphrase. Flying cars used to be a standard part of the sf 21st century -- along with videophones. Here's the 21st century; where are all the flying cars?

The sf writers were being conservative. Nonfiction predictions that flying cars would replace automobiles in the near future have been around at least since the 1940s and probably longer. The same for videophones replacing voice-only telephones.

They've been available; they haven't been bought. Flying cars have been around for decades; they keep being reinvented. Videophones have been around since at least the late 1960s; see John Pierce's essay in _Toward the Year 2000_ (1967; edited by Daniel Bell).

The paperless office is more recent. Many organizations have the technology needed for paperless offices. They aren't using it that way.

A couple years ago, someone who's enthusiastic about nanotechnology told me that with nanotech, people wouldn't have to live in crowded places like Manhattan. I explained that very few people _have_ to live in Manhattan.

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From EurekAlert http://www.eurekalert.org/pubnews.php
Public Release: 21-Jan-2004
How to second guess hack attacks
Mutating software could predict and defend attacks against computers before hackers have even developed them. American software engineers say their system predicts future hackers' strategies by taking known hacking software and systematically mutating it to find the most deadly recombinations.
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Wetlands get new spy cam
Massachusetts uses digitized arial photos to police wetlands
encroachment. By Mark Clayton
http://www.csmonitor.com/2004/0122/p11s02-sten.html
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From the Australian edition of Google News:
Rings trilogy puts new face on cancer treatment
NEWS.com.au - 15 hours ago
THE last place technician Tom Deans expected to end up when he searched the internet for ways to improve cancer treatment was the Lord of the Rings website.
Movie magic makes for medical marvel The West Australian
Movie technology saving lives The Australian
Sunday Times - Daily Telegraph - and 14 related

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