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Dan Goodman's prediction and politics journal.

Tuesday, March 02, 2004

Comments I made in a thread on cakmpls's LiveJournal:

I'm neither a visual nor a verbal thinker (usually,) but this is what I see/feel as the difference -- either in the character's actions or in the narrator's mindset:

To me, "she sat down" means she sat without much thinking about it. "She seated herself" means she considered carefully what she was doing.

But sometimes one of these is the way the narrator sees the act of sitting; and usually sees it no matter who's sitting down.

In this context, the narrator might be a first-person speaker or an implied narrator (usually an authorial persona). [Or, in some second-person stories, one of each playing pingpong with point of view.]

Does that make sense?

***What I remember best is body sensations. I can remember how it felt to move around in places where I've lived much better than I can remember what they looked like.

I think in patterns -- but for the most part, I don't know what the patterns are made up of.

I either developed or became aware of synesthesia relatively late. When I was about 12, I saw blind kids walking around without bumping into things and asked about it. They didn't have an explanation. (I've found out since that it's echolocation -- or, as it's usually called in humans, "facial vision"). I learned to do it by trying; it feels like touch.

When I was about 18, someone asked me if I could see music.
I "looked" and found that I could. I think it was the relatively conventional sound-to-colors synesthesia. After that, I started doing this with all sounds. What I see shifted to shapes and textures. Now it seems to be shifting into diagrams in two to four dimensions.

I "see" speech written, though I usually don't pay much attention to this. I was slightly unnerved when I realized that this never seemed to be in the same typeface twice.

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