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Dan Goodman's prediction and politics journal.

Thursday, June 03, 2004

Thursday June 3, 2004. Last night, I did some leg exercises with my right leg -- the one I've had the most problems with. It didn't get as cold last night, and it feels better this morning. So, I'm going to start doing exercises with both legs. (The problem is poor circulation in my leg veins.)

Also last night, I drank catnip tea for the first time in a while. It doesn't have the effect on me it does on cats

Today: I ran into Nate Bucklin on the #23 bus.

To the Walker Library, where I paid my fines and then took out books.

Then a #6 bus to Franklin Avenue, and the #2 along Franklin to the Seward co-op.

Franklin Avenue is still recovering from the loss of the streetcar line. That loss was nearly fifty years ago.

I decided I don't like the Seward co-op as much as I like the Wedge.
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From rec.arts.mystery:

Me:>> I've read that the territory of Japanese villages used to be "as far as the drums can be heard." Which would account for LOUD DRUMS being selected for.
>
> This is true.
>
> Dave
> http://www.kumidaiko.com/
> The Source for Taiko News
>
Thanks!

And it occurs to me that it's probably a good thing no society has set the boundaries at "As far as the village can be smelled."
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Writing: Daily exercise -- On alt.callahans, a Libertarian explained to me that we all know the abolition of the state is not a realistic goal. I explained back that non-state governments had existed about twenty times longer than state governments (or two hundred times longer, depending on one's definition of "human.") That the nation-state is only a couple of centuries old. And that new technologies might make new forms of government possible.

Today's exercise turned out to be speculation on what those new forms of government might be.

"Well Met, Well Met, My Own True Love" -- One word in title changed, from "Old" to "Own". A bit more of the story fleshed out. Took out a chunk which I'd decided didn't belong; I'll probably give the information in a brief conversation, rather than half of the ending scene.
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