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Dan Goodman's prediction and politics journal.

Wednesday, June 23, 2004

A whole bunch of science news:

From EurekAlert http://www.eurekalert.org/pubnews.php:
Public Release: 22-Jun-2004
Nature
A wireless nanodevice that functions like a fluorescent light - but potentially far more efficiently - has been developed in a joint project between the National Nuclear Security Administration's Los Alamos and Sandia national laboratories.

Public Release: 22-Jun-2004
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Researchers at the University of Michigan, Johns Hopkins and the Institute of Bioinformatics in India have discovered a gene-expression "signature" common to distinct types of cancer, renewing hope that a universal treatment for the nation's second leading killer might be found.

Public Release: 22-Jun-2004
New version of premier global climate model released
The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colo., is unveiling a powerful new version of a supercomputer-based system to model Earth's climate and to project global temperature rise in coming decades.

Public Release: 22-Jun-2004
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Researchers induce temporary blindness to learn more about vision
By using transcranial magnetic stimulation to rapidly induce temporary blindness, researchers at Rice University found evidence that an older, primitive part of the brain helps process visual information unconsciously.

Public Release: 22-Jun-2004
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Rapid urbanization in southeastern China in the past 25 years is responsible for an estimated warming rate much larger than previous estimates for other periods and locations, according to a new study funded by NASA. Researchers led by the Georgia Institute of Technology report that the mean surface temperature in the region has risen 0.09 degrees Fahrenheit (0.05 degrees Celsius) per decade since 1979.
NASA

Public Release: 22-Jun-2004
Nature
Origin of West Indian insect eater much older than previously thought
Researcher Mark Springer, a professor of biology at the University of California, Riverside, is part of a team that has traced the origins of the shrew-like Caribbean creatures, known as solenodons, to the Mesozoic era, making them contemporaries with the dinosaurs.

From Scientific American's e-newsletter:
Athletes will be going to Athens this summer to take part in a tradition begun in Greece more than 2,000 years ago. As the world's finest specimens of fitness test the extreme limits of human strength, speed and agility, some of them will probably also engage in a more recent, less inspiring Olympic tradition: using performance-enhancing drugs. Sports authorities fear that a new form of doping will be undetectable and thus much less preventable. Treatments that regenerate muscle, increase its strength, and protect it from degradation will soon be entering human clinical trials for muscle-wasting disorders. Among these are therapies that give patients a synthetic gene, which can last for years, producing high amounts of naturally occurring muscle-building chemicals.
www.sciam.com/article.cfm?chanID=sa006&articleID=000E7ACE-5686-10CF-94EB83414B7F0000
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